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Monday, April 27, 2015

SPRING IS HERE,... FINALLY! remember your LAWNMOWER SAFETY



help us to promote

Lawnmower Safety

These Injuries can be devastating to the hand ...or any part of the body that is involved.
  • 22% of injuries involve the hand, fingers or wrist.  25% of which result in amputation

  • Lawnmowers should be considered potentially lethal in the hands of children.

  • Children under age 6 should be inside when the lawn is being mowed.

  • Children under age 12 should not be allowed to go near a power lawnmower and should be at least 16 before using a riding mower.

  • Safety training is essential always.




MORE RESOURCES:

ASSH LAWNMOWER SAFETY

Keep Your Hands Safe: Follow Lawnmower Safety Tips

Each year, more than 74,000 small children, adolescents and adults are injured by rotary, hand and riding power mowers due to improper handling. The American Society for Surgery of the Hand would like to provide you with patient information to help you avoid these injuries.
Kinetics of Rotary Power LawnmowersKinetic energy (motion) imparted by a standard rotary blade is comparable to the energy generated by dropping a 21-pound weight from a height of 100 feet or is equal to three times the muzzle energy of a .357 Magnum pistol. Blade speed can eject a piece of wire or an object at speeds up to 100 miles per hour.
Injury Profile
Adults 25-64 years
Children under age five
22% involve wrist, hand or finger
14% involve foot, ankle or toes
25% of all hand and foot injuries result in amputation
Deaths occurred in children under six years of age
Common Injury Patterns
  • Direct contact with rotating or jammed blade
  • Serious avulsion (tearing/separating) injuries to soft tissue and bones
  • Gross contamination from contact with grass and soil harboring pathogens
  • Injuries requiring multiple staged surgeries to cleanse wounds and provide soft tissue coverage (to regenerate healthy tissue/skin)
Common Weather Conditions
  • Wet grass
  • Damp ground
Other Causes of Injury
  • Passengers (adult/child) on riding mowers or in cart towed behind mower
  • Mower being pulled backward
  • Sloping lawn mowed by power mower up and down slope, instead of across
  • Sloping lawn mowed by riding mower across slope, instead of up and down
  • Wearing sandals or open-toed shoes
  • Operator attempts to unclog blades with hand or foot
Lawnmowers are safe if used properly.
Remember the following:
  • Read your mower's instruction manual prior to use.
  • DO NOT REMOVE safety devices or guards on switches.
  • NEVER insert hands or feet into the mower to remove grass or debris. Even with the motor turned off, the blade remains engaged.
  • ALWAYS use a stick or broom handle to remove any obstruction.
  • NEVER cut grass when it is wet or when the ground is damp.
  • NEVER allow a child to operate the mower at any time or be in the area to be mowed.
  • NEVER allow passengers, other than the operator, on riding mowers.
  • Keep your mower in good working order with sharp blades.
  • DO NOT DRINK before or while using your lawnmower.
  • Wear protective boots, goggles, gloves and long pants.
  • Do not operate the lawnmower while barefoot.
  • Be cautious when mowing hills or slopes.
REMEMBER — SAFETY FIRST AT ALL TIMES!
Copyright © American Society for Surgery of the Hand 2009.

2008 AAOS Position Statement taken from AAOS website by www.handctr.com 



Power Lawnmower Safety.
This Position Statement was developed as an educational tool based on the opinion of the authors. It is not a product
of a systematic review. Readers are encouraged to consider the information presented and reach their own
conclusions.
More than 210,000 people – including approximately 16,000 children - were treated in doctors’ offices, clinics and
emergency rooms for lawnmower-related injuries in 2007, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety
Commission. Lawnmower injuries often result in partial or complete amputation of both lower and upper extremities.
The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons believes that the great majority of these injuries are
preventable. The Academy recommends the following safety guidelines when using lawnmower
equipment.


Never let children operate lawnmowers. Keep kids 15 years of age and younger away when lawnmowers are in use.

Children should not be in the yard while the lawn is being mowed.

No riders other than the operator, regardless of age, should be allowed on a riding mower.

Be sure the motor has been turned off before inspecting or repairing power lawnmower equipment.

Do not tamper with safety release switches.

Keep lawnmowers in good working order with sharp blades.

Remove stones, toys and other objects from the lawn before you start mowing.

Wear protective gloves, goggles, boots and long pants when you use lawnmowers. Never mow barefoot or in
sandals.

Use caution when mowing hills and slopes. Mow across with a push mower; mow up and down with a riding
mower. Do not cut wet grass.

Be sure the motor is off before inspecting or repairing lawnmower equipment.

Read the instruction manual before using a lawnmower.

Be sober (i.e., don’t drink and mow.)

Do not remove safety devices, shield or guards on switches, and keep hands and feet away from moving parts.

Stay away from the engine cowling, as it can become very hot and burn unprotected flesh.

Add fuel before starting the engine, not when it is running or hot.

Use a stick or broom handle (not your hands or feet) to remove debris in lawnmowers or snowblowers.

Do not leave a lawnmower unattended when it is running. If you must walk away from the machine, shut off the
engine.

March 1998. Revised December 2008 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.
This material may not be modified without the express written permission of the American Academy of Orthopaedic
Surgeons .
Position Statement 1142
For additional information, contact Public Relations Department at 847-384-4031.
-PRIVACY POLICY- Disclaimers & Agreement Advertising & Sponsorship Contact AAOS Technical Requirements Careers
6300 North River Road Rosemont, Illinois 60018-4262 Phone 847.823.7186 Fax 847.823.8125
© 1995-2009 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. "All Rights Reserved." This website and its contents may not be reproduced in whole
or in part without written permission. "American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons" and its associated seal and "American Association of Orthopaedic
Surgeons" and its logo are all registered U.S. trademarks and may not be used without written permission.
Surgeons" and its logo are all registered U.S. trademarks and may not be used without written permission.




LINKS:

Lawn Mower-Related Injuries to Children:Committee on Injury and Poison Prevention

Monday, January 26, 2015

WINTER IS COMING... SNOW BLOWER SAFETY



WINTER IS COMING....

Snow Blower Safety

Recommendations for safe use of a jammed snow blower snow blowers include: (OCD STICK)

1. If the snow blower jams, immediately turn it OFF
2. Disengage the CLUTCH
3. DELAY...Wait 10 seconds after shutting of to allow Impeller Blades to stop rotating
4. Always use a STICK or broom handle to clear impacted snow. The stick most be strong enough to avoid breakage or eye injures can result from flying fragments.
5. Never put your hand near chute or around blades
6. Keep all shields in place. Do not remove safety devices on machine
7. Keep hands and feet away from moving parts
8. Keep a clear head, concentrate and ...
    Do not drink alcoholic beverages before using a snow blower

As physicians dedicated to the care of the Hand and Upper extremity we want to inform the public concerning the perils and pitfalls of improper snow blower use.  Physicians, nurses, allied health professionals and therapists who deal with these injuries live in fear of the first heavy wet snow of the season. Invariably injuries are seen despite general knowledge that these injuries occur. These safety tips cannot guarantee against injury but hopefully if you are reading these or even better spreading these, it is one more step towards preventing these types of injuries.

News organizations and weather services can help.

Conditions that are associated with a higher incidence of injuries, hay wet snow exceeding 6 inches of accumulation and temperatures above 28 degrees Fahrenheit offer good opportunities to provide warning for the public. We need your help to reduce the incidence of these preventable injuries.

Wednesday, December 31, 2014

New Years Fireworks Pose Safety Threats to Hands and Fingers

Last Modified: Tuesday, December 30, 2014 11:36 AM
New Year’s Eve is the perfect time to celebrate the accomplishments of last year — and fireworks are a great way to do that. But with great firepower comes great responsibility. 
While fireworks are fun, they can be very dangerous if not used properly.
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission reported eight deaths and an estimated 11,400 fireworks-related injuries in 2013. Let’s make sure that number is zero this holiday.
If you are at a party for New Year’s Eve where consumer fireworks are being shot, make sure there is a designated fireworks handler who has not been drinking.
“Each New Year’s Eve, consumers are injured because their judgment has been impaired by beer, wine, or other alcoholic drink. Alcohol and fireworks do not mix,” said Nancy Blogin, president of the National Council on Fireworks Safety.
see more at
http://www.americanpress.com/Take-care-to-ring-in-2015-with-a-safe-bang


Firework safety for the new year


Bringing in the new year is meant to be fun, especially when fireworks are included. But with nationwide statistics saying burns to the hands and face are very common with fireworks, it is important to know what not to do. 

"Just common sense really, number one fireworks and alcohol simply do not mix," said Fire Marshal Chris Etheredge from the Dothan Fire Department. "Let someone who is not drinking put on the display for you."

Keep in mind never to look into your explosive to try and figure out why it may not have gone off right away, and reading directions could also save you from a trip to the hospital. 

"Keep a water source close by in case there is a fire that started from the fireworks and number two, if you have any type of injury seek medical attention immediately if it's significant, of course, dial 9-1-1," he said. 

One particular type of firework to look out for is sparklers, nationwide they cause the most injuries to the hands especially with children. 


"They're beautiful, they're fun but using them with common sense will ensure that everybody has a good safe New Years without injury," said Etheredge. 


more at http://www.dothanfirst.com/story/d/story/firework-safety-for-the-new-year/34538/6hjvyzLo2kSpI-5GzxubTQ






4 ways people get hurt on New Years from TIME

Fireworks
More than 11,000 people sustained injuries from fireworks last year, including eight fatal injuries. The best way to avoid an injury from fireworks is to let the professionals handle them. But, if you do feel the need to launch your own pyrotechnics, there are a few rules to follow. First, don’t hand fireworks off to kids, even the smaller and seemingly less dangerous ones. Around 40% of injuries came from small devices like bottle rockets and sparklers in 2013, and children under five experienced a higher rate of fireworks injury than any other age group, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Also, avoid illegal or homemade options. If a firework is illegal, there’s a reason.


Monday, November 24, 2014

Western Massachusetts SNOW BLOWER safety for Thanksgiving Storm Cato

Keep Hands Safe When Using Snow Blowers


#thanksgiving2014 #snow

Snow Blower Safety

Recommendations for safe use of a jammed snow blower snow blowers include: (O C D  STICK)

1. If the snow blower jams, immediately turn it OFF
2. Disengage the CLUTCH
3. DELAY...Wait 10 seconds after shutting of to allow Impeller Blades to stop rotating
4. Always use a STICK or broom handle to clear impacted snow. The stick most be strong enough to avoid breakage or eye injures can result from flying fragments.
5. Never put your hand near chute or around blades
6. Keep all shields in place. Do not remove safety devices on machine
7. Keep hands and feet away from moving parts
8. Keep a clear head, concentrate and ...
    Do not drink alcoholic beverages before using a snow blower

As physicians dedicated to the care of the Hand and Upper extremity we want to inform the public concerning the perils and pitfalls of improper snow blower use.  Physicians, nurses, allied health professionals and therapists who deal with these injuries live in fear of the first heavy wet snow of the season. Invariably injuries are seen despite general knowledge that these injuries occur. These safety tips cannot guarantee against injury but hopefully if you are reading these or even better spreading these, it is one more step towards preventing these types of injuries.



Injury Profile*
Average age: 44 years
Sex: Male
Dominant hand — 90% of injuries
Amputations of tips of fingers
Middle finger most commonly injured
Common Weather Conditions
  • Heavy, wet snow
  • Large snow accumulation, greater than six inches
  • Temperature: 28 degrees Fahrenheit or greater
Injury Causes*
  • Snow clogging the exit chute of the machine
  • Not noticing that the impeller blades are still rotating even though the machine is off
  • Operator attempts to clean the clogged exit chute with hands
  • Hands connect with the rotating blades, resulting in severe injury
Snowblowers are safe if used properly.

Remember — if your snowblower jams*:
  • Turn it OFF!
  • Disengage CLUTCH.
  • DELAY, Wait five seconds after shutting machine off to allow impeller blades to stop rotating.
  • ALWAYS use a STICK or broom handle to clear impacted snow.
  • NEVER put your hand down chute or around blades.
  • Keep all shields in place. DO NOT REMOVE the safety devices on the machine.
  • Keep hands and feet away from all moving parts.
  • Keep a clear head, concentrate, and
  • DO NOT DRINK before using your snowblower!
REMEMBER — SAFETY FIRST AT ALL TIMES!

News organizations and weather services can help

Conditions that are associated with a higher incidence of injuries, hay wet snow exceeding 6 inches of accumulation and temperatures above 28 degrees Fahrenheit offer good opportunities to provide warning for the public. We need your help to reduce the incidence of these preventable injuries. Let others know of this problem. Publicize these safety tips and injury statistics for every large snowstorm in your region.

Remind your colleagues, friends and neighbors when you see them outside. Lets put an end to these devastating injuries.

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Xiaflex for Dupuytren's Disease

Xiaflex for Dupuytren's Disease

Xiaflex is used to treat cords that form in Dupuytren's Disease in the hand. Xiaflex injection on day one  is followed a day later by manipulation to break the cord and fully extend the finger. Fast forward if you wish to see the manipulation at 3:30.
Xiaflex for Dupuytren's
XIAFLEX® (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) is a prescription medicine used to treat adult patients with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. Over time, the thickening of this cord in your hand can cause one or more fingers to bend toward your palm, so that you cannot straighten them. XIAFLEX should be injected into the cord by a healthcare provider who is experienced in injection procedures of the hand and treating people with Dupuytren's contracture. XIAFLEX helps "break" the cord that is causing the finger to be bent.

Important Safety Information

XIAFLEX can cause serious side effects, including:
  • Tendon or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit.
  • Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider if you get numbness, tingling, or increased pain in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit.
  • Allergic Reactions. Allergic reactions can happen in people who have received an injection of XIAFLEX because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX: hives; swollen face; breathing trouble; or chest pain.
Before receiving XIAFLEX, tell your healthcare provider if you have had an allergic reaction to a previous XIAFLEX injection, or have a bleeding problem or any other medical conditions. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Be sure to tell them if you use blood thinners such as aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix®), prasugrel hydrochloride (Effient®), or warfarin sodium (Coumadin®).
Common side effects with XIAFLEX include: swelling of the injection site or the hand, bleeding or bruising at the injection site; and pain or tenderness of the injection site or the hand, swelling of the lymph nodes (glands) in the elbow or underarm, itching, breaks in the skin, redness or warmth of the skin, and pain in the underarm.
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Please click here for Patient Education Brochure.
Please click here for Full Prescribing Information.
Please click here for Medication Guide.
This site and product information is intended for U.S. residents only.

Saturday, October 4, 2014

Pumpkin Carving Dangers

Hand Surgeons Warn of Pumpkin Carving Dangers

from ASSH (American Society for Surgery of the Hand)

Use caution during the Halloween season, and take steps to prevent hand injuries when carving.
“Every Halloween season we see four or five patients—both adults and children—who come into our office with severe injuries to their hands and fingers,” says Jeffrey Wint, MD, an ASSH member from The Hand Center of Western Massachusetts, Springfield, MA. “Treatment can often run three to four months from the time of surgery through rehabilitation.”

To prevent hand injuries, the ASSH suggests the following safety tips

Carve at a Clean, Dry, Well-lit Area
Wash and thoroughly dry all of the tools that you will use to carve the pumpkin: carving tools, knife, cutting surface, and your hands. Any moisture on your tools, hands, or table can cause slipping that can lead to injuries.
Always Have Adult Supervision
“All too often we see adolescent patients with injuries because adults feel the kids are responsible enough to be left on their own,” says Wint. “Even though the carving may be going great, it only takes a second for an injury to occur.”
Leave the Carving to Adults
Never let children do the carving. Wint suggests letting kids draw a pattern on the pumpkin and have them be responsible for cleaning out the inside pulp and seeds. When the adults do start cutting, they should always cut away from themselves and cut in small, controlled strokes.
Sharper is not Better
“A sharper knife is not necessarily better because it often becomes wedged in the thicker part of the pumpkin, requiring force to remove it,” says Wint. “An injury can occur if your hand is in the wrong place when the knife finally dislodges from the thick skin of the pumpkin. Injuries are also sustained when the knife slips and comes out the other side of the pumpkin where your hand may be holding it steady.”
Special pumpkin carving kits are available in stores and include small serrated pumpkin saws that work better because they are less likely to get stuck in the thick pumpkin tissue. “If they do get jammed and then wedged free, they are not sharp enough to cause a deep, penetrating cut,” says Wint.
Help for a pumpkin carving injury
Should you cut your finger or hand, bleeding from minor cuts will often stop on their own by applying direct pressure to the wound with a clean cloth. If continuous pressure does not slow or stop the bleeding after 15 minutes, an emergency room visit may be required.