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Monday, November 24, 2014

Western Massachusetts SNOW BLOWER safety for Thanksgiving Storm Cato

Keep Hands Safe When Using Snow Blowers


#thanksgiving2014 #snow

Snow Blower Safety

Recommendations for safe use of a jammed snow blower snow blowers include: (O C D  STICK)

1. If the snow blower jams, immediately turn it OFF
2. Disengage the CLUTCH
3. DELAY...Wait 10 seconds after shutting of to allow Impeller Blades to stop rotating
4. Always use a STICK or broom handle to clear impacted snow. The stick most be strong enough to avoid breakage or eye injures can result from flying fragments.
5. Never put your hand near chute or around blades
6. Keep all shields in place. Do not remove safety devices on machine
7. Keep hands and feet away from moving parts
8. Keep a clear head, concentrate and ...
    Do not drink alcoholic beverages before using a snow blower

As physicians dedicated to the care of the Hand and Upper extremity we want to inform the public concerning the perils and pitfalls of improper snow blower use.  Physicians, nurses, allied health professionals and therapists who deal with these injuries live in fear of the first heavy wet snow of the season. Invariably injuries are seen despite general knowledge that these injuries occur. These safety tips cannot guarantee against injury but hopefully if you are reading these or even better spreading these, it is one more step towards preventing these types of injuries.



Injury Profile*
Average age: 44 years
Sex: Male
Dominant hand — 90% of injuries
Amputations of tips of fingers
Middle finger most commonly injured
Common Weather Conditions
  • Heavy, wet snow
  • Large snow accumulation, greater than six inches
  • Temperature: 28 degrees Fahrenheit or greater
Injury Causes*
  • Snow clogging the exit chute of the machine
  • Not noticing that the impeller blades are still rotating even though the machine is off
  • Operator attempts to clean the clogged exit chute with hands
  • Hands connect with the rotating blades, resulting in severe injury
Snowblowers are safe if used properly.

Remember — if your snowblower jams*:
  • Turn it OFF!
  • Disengage CLUTCH.
  • DELAY, Wait five seconds after shutting machine off to allow impeller blades to stop rotating.
  • ALWAYS use a STICK or broom handle to clear impacted snow.
  • NEVER put your hand down chute or around blades.
  • Keep all shields in place. DO NOT REMOVE the safety devices on the machine.
  • Keep hands and feet away from all moving parts.
  • Keep a clear head, concentrate, and
  • DO NOT DRINK before using your snowblower!
REMEMBER — SAFETY FIRST AT ALL TIMES!

News organizations and weather services can help

Conditions that are associated with a higher incidence of injuries, hay wet snow exceeding 6 inches of accumulation and temperatures above 28 degrees Fahrenheit offer good opportunities to provide warning for the public. We need your help to reduce the incidence of these preventable injuries. Let others know of this problem. Publicize these safety tips and injury statistics for every large snowstorm in your region.

Remind your colleagues, friends and neighbors when you see them outside. Lets put an end to these devastating injuries.

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Xiaflex for Dupuytren's Disease

Xiaflex for Dupuytren's Disease

Xiaflex is used to treat cords that form in Dupuytren's Disease in the hand. Xiaflex injection on day one  is followed a day later by manipulation to break the cord and fully extend the finger. Fast forward if you wish to see the manipulation at 3:30.
Xiaflex for Dupuytren's
XIAFLEX® (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) is a prescription medicine used to treat adult patients with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. Over time, the thickening of this cord in your hand can cause one or more fingers to bend toward your palm, so that you cannot straighten them. XIAFLEX should be injected into the cord by a healthcare provider who is experienced in injection procedures of the hand and treating people with Dupuytren's contracture. XIAFLEX helps "break" the cord that is causing the finger to be bent.

Important Safety Information

XIAFLEX can cause serious side effects, including:
  • Tendon or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit.
  • Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider if you get numbness, tingling, or increased pain in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit.
  • Allergic Reactions. Allergic reactions can happen in people who have received an injection of XIAFLEX because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX: hives; swollen face; breathing trouble; or chest pain.
Before receiving XIAFLEX, tell your healthcare provider if you have had an allergic reaction to a previous XIAFLEX injection, or have a bleeding problem or any other medical conditions. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Be sure to tell them if you use blood thinners such as aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix®), prasugrel hydrochloride (Effient®), or warfarin sodium (Coumadin®).
Common side effects with XIAFLEX include: swelling of the injection site or the hand, bleeding or bruising at the injection site; and pain or tenderness of the injection site or the hand, swelling of the lymph nodes (glands) in the elbow or underarm, itching, breaks in the skin, redness or warmth of the skin, and pain in the underarm.
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Please click here for Patient Education Brochure.
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Please click here for Medication Guide.
This site and product information is intended for U.S. residents only.

Saturday, October 4, 2014

Pumpkin Carving Dangers

Hand Surgeons Warn of Pumpkin Carving Dangers

from ASSH (American Society for Surgery of the Hand)

Use caution during the Halloween season, and take steps to prevent hand injuries when carving.
“Every Halloween season we see four or five patients—both adults and children—who come into our office with severe injuries to their hands and fingers,” says Jeffrey Wint, MD, an ASSH member from The Hand Center of Western Massachusetts, Springfield, MA. “Treatment can often run three to four months from the time of surgery through rehabilitation.”

To prevent hand injuries, the ASSH suggests the following safety tips

Carve at a Clean, Dry, Well-lit Area
Wash and thoroughly dry all of the tools that you will use to carve the pumpkin: carving tools, knife, cutting surface, and your hands. Any moisture on your tools, hands, or table can cause slipping that can lead to injuries.
Always Have Adult Supervision
“All too often we see adolescent patients with injuries because adults feel the kids are responsible enough to be left on their own,” says Wint. “Even though the carving may be going great, it only takes a second for an injury to occur.”
Leave the Carving to Adults
Never let children do the carving. Wint suggests letting kids draw a pattern on the pumpkin and have them be responsible for cleaning out the inside pulp and seeds. When the adults do start cutting, they should always cut away from themselves and cut in small, controlled strokes.
Sharper is not Better
“A sharper knife is not necessarily better because it often becomes wedged in the thicker part of the pumpkin, requiring force to remove it,” says Wint. “An injury can occur if your hand is in the wrong place when the knife finally dislodges from the thick skin of the pumpkin. Injuries are also sustained when the knife slips and comes out the other side of the pumpkin where your hand may be holding it steady.”
Special pumpkin carving kits are available in stores and include small serrated pumpkin saws that work better because they are less likely to get stuck in the thick pumpkin tissue. “If they do get jammed and then wedged free, they are not sharp enough to cause a deep, penetrating cut,” says Wint.
Help for a pumpkin carving injury
Should you cut your finger or hand, bleeding from minor cuts will often stop on their own by applying direct pressure to the wound with a clean cloth. If continuous pressure does not slow or stop the bleeding after 15 minutes, an emergency room visit may be required.

Pumpkin Carving Dangers


Hand Surgeons Warn of Pumpkin Carving Dangers

from ASSH (American Society for Surgery of the Hand)

Use caution during the Halloween season, and take steps to prevent hand injuries when carving.
“Every Halloween season we see four or five patients—both adults and children—who come into our office with severe injuries to their hands and fingers,” says Jeffrey Wint, MD, an ASSH member from The Hand Center of Western Massachusetts, Springfield, MA. “Treatment can often run three to four months from the time of surgery through rehabilitation.”

To prevent hand injuries, the ASSH suggests the following safety tips

Carve at a Clean, Dry, Well-lit Area
Wash and thoroughly dry all of the tools that you will use to carve the pumpkin: carving tools, knife, cutting surface, and your hands. Any moisture on your tools, hands, or table can cause slipping that can lead to injuries.
Always Have Adult Supervision
“All too often we see adolescent patients with injuries because adults feel the kids are responsible enough to be left on their own,” says Wint. “Even though the carving may be going great, it only takes a second for an injury to occur.”
Leave the Carving to Adults
Never let children do the carving. Wint suggests letting kids draw a pattern on the pumpkin and have them be responsible for cleaning out the inside pulp and seeds. When the adults do start cutting, they should always cut away from themselves and cut in small, controlled strokes.
Sharper is not Better
“A sharper knife is not necessarily better because it often becomes wedged in the thicker part of the pumpkin, requiring force to remove it,” says Wint. “An injury can occur if your hand is in the wrong place when the knife finally dislodges from the thick skin of the pumpkin. Injuries are also sustained when the knife slips and comes out the other side of the pumpkin where your hand may be holding it steady.”
Use a Pumpkin Carving Kit
Special pumpkin carving kits are available in stores and include small serrated pumpkin saws that work better because they are less likely to get stuck in the thick pumpkin tissue. “If they do get jammed and then wedged free, they are not sharp enough to cause a deep, penetrating cut,” says Wint.
Help for a pumpkin carving injury
Should you cut your finger or hand, bleeding from minor cuts will often stop on their own by applying direct pressure to the wound with a clean cloth. If continuous pressure does not slow or stop the bleeding after 15 minutes, an emergency room visit may be required.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

ENTEROVIRUS D68




Enterovirus D68 prevention, symptoms and Treatment. We have taken the liberty of reposting this from Baystate Children's Hospital. Please show this to family, friends and relatives.ED enterovirus.pdf

Sunday, August 10, 2014

Why choose us for Hand and Wrist and Upper Extremity Surgery?



Dr Wint, Wintman and Martin ( L to R)


If you choose the hand center, you will always be seen by one of our highly skilled Hand surgeons at every visit. 


Here at The Hand Center of Western Massachusetts our physicians provide the individual attention and care that you need. 



We've seen it before
We strive to work closely with our patients and their families, other medical professionals, employers and insurance carriers to provide you with needed care. We know that the path to recovery from minor to major injuries can be a difficult one. Our highly specialized physicians and caring staff are interestedin your success. If you have a question or problem while treating with us,  we want to hear about it.

For example , at Baystate Medical Center our hand and wrist surgery experience for our three surgeons combined is well  over  25 years as hand surgeons who have taken Emergency call for  acute problems and the most severe injuries. For overall experience with hand surgery we have even more combined years than that!  This give our surgeons and our office staff a high level of  wisdom and experience  that is put to work for you. If it involves the hand and wrist and upper extremity our surgeons and  staff have seen it before. Whether we evaluate you in one of our three offices in Springfield, Ware or Enfield or go to any one of the locations where we do surgery, this experience follows. 



Well Respected in the Community

All of our hand surgeons have been awarded recognition by their peers and patients for their work. Including several patient portals and  physician rating websites. Each has won awards from these sites for several years. Ask your friend, relatives and  your primary care provider about us. Chances are  they know of someone we have taken care of in the past.

It's What we do

At The Hand Center of Western Massachusetts, we care for the hand, upper extremity, and shoulder, including fractures, tendonitis, lacerations, nerve compression, carpal tunnel, arthritis, and workerscompensation injuries, just to name a few. Our Hand and Upper Extremity Surgeons are consideredby many  in the community to be the premier source for care of these areas including bone, joint, tendon and nerve problems.

Our specialists diagnose and treat injuries and diseases of the hand and wrist and upper extremity  in adults and children.

We offer a wide range of services from initial consultations to non-surgical and minimally invasive treatments, to complex reconstructions for the most difficult of  hand, wrist and upper extremity problems.  


The Hand Center is devoted to the care of the Hand, Upper Extremity and Shoulder. Our staff wants to provide you with a high quality of care. We are committed to successfully returning you to your daily work and leisure activities.



Doctors Wint, Wintman, and Martin are fellowship trained hand surgeons. Doctors Wint and Wintman

are trained and Board Certified in Orthopaedic surgery of the hand. Dr. Martin is trained in plastic surgery, and is Board Certified. All three physicians have added qualifications in Surgery of the Hand, which is awarded after additional requirements of training, practice experience   and  ongoing Maintenance of certification.



Our physicians have surgical privileges at Baystate Medical CenterPioneer Valley Surgicenter,







Tuesday, July 1, 2014

PREVENT FIREWORKS AND FIRECRACKER INJURY


Be safe this fourth of July , enjoy yourself and prevent

Firecracker or Fireworks Injuries from occurring.

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, national losses involving fireworks amount to 3 deaths and 10,527 injuries annually.Hand and finger injuries are the most common and account for 32 percent of all injuries. Head and eye injuries occur with about the same frequency, equaling 19 and 18 percent of total injuries.
A review of firework mishaps shows a variety of factors contribute to the typical mishap. Most pre-school age victims are injured by fireworks ignited by someone else, while older children who are injured are usually lighting the fireworks themselves. Children under age five are commonly hurt by rocket-type fireworks; small firecrackers and ground spinners injure the majority of children between the ages of 5 and 14. Most of the injuries associated with large, illegal firecrackers such as M-80's are to older teenagers or adults.


Hand Surgeons Agree: Leave Fireworks to the Professionals

The American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) has urged the public to leave fireworks in the hands of the professionals.
According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, 38% of all reported fireworks-related injuries from June 22-July 22, 2001, were to fingers, hands, and arms. These injuries included burns, lacerations, fractures, and traumatic amputation.
Of the finger, hand, and arm injuries, the majority of injuries were caused from accidents involving firecrackers, bottle rockets, and sparklers— the three firework-types most often used in a backyard environment. Accidents involving firecrackers, bottle rockets, and hand-held sparklers totaled 57% of all firework injuries (source: American Pyrotechnic Association).
One solution that has been offered by the ASSH to individuals is to attend public fireworks displays, which are monitored for safety by a local fire department, rather than setting off fireworks near or around the home.

The following precautions should be taken when attending a public fireworks display:

  • Obey safety barriers and ushers.
  • Stay back a minimum of 500 feet from the launching site.
  • Resist the temptation to pick up firework debris when the display is over. The debris may still be hot, or in some cases, the debris might be “live” and could still explode.
  • Never give children hand-held sparklers. Sparklers cause 10% of all firework injuries (source: American Pyrotechnics Association)—and were associated with the most injuries to children under 5 years of age. (source: U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission)
The Hand Center of Western Massachusetts agrees -- keep your hands safe this fourth of July. Enjoy the day and leave fireworks to the professionals
Portions Copyright © American Society for Surgery of the Hand 2008.
Modified/adapted altered by www.handctr.com from assh.org

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