Friday, October 5, 2018

Dupuytren's Disease Does it get worse as the weather gets colder?






IT makes sense. Cold impairs circulation and can increase stiffness, reduce circulation and have other effects. Poor circulation or diabetes which also affects circulation can make dupuytrens worse. Smoking similarly impairs circulation and make dupuytrens worse. 

Does your Dupuytrens get worse in the winter?



What is Dupuytren's disease?
Dupuytren’s disease is an abnormal thickening of the tissue just beneath the skin known as fascia. This thickening occurs in the palm and can extend into the fingers (see Figure 1). Firm cords and lumps may develop that can cause the fingers to bend into the palm (see Figure 2), in which case it is described as Dupuytren’s contracture. Although the skin may become involved in the process, the deeper structures—such as the tendons—are not directly involved. Occasionally, the disease will cause thickening on top of the finger knuckles (knuckle pads), or nodules or cords within the soles of the feet (plantar fibromatosis).  Dupuytren's Disease is named after a French anatomist and military surgeon Baron Guillaume Dupuytren(1777-1835).

What causes Dupuytren's disease?

The cause of Dupuytren’s disease is unknown but may be associated with certain biochemical factors within the involved fascia. The problem is more common in men over age 40 and in people of northern European descent. There is no proven evidence that hand injuries or specific occupational exposures lead to a higher risk of developing Dupuytren’s disease.

Dupuytrens treatment using moist heat




BENEFITS OF HEAT TREATMENTS

Heat or warmth will help get things moving by speeding up the molecules in tissues and increasing blood flow. Heat is helpful for stiff joints and muscles, and can be useful prior to an activity. We often see an athlete warming up before a workout.
A warm shower or bath can help sore, stiff joints, especially in the early morning.  A warm compress or heating pad can also relieve stiffness (Figure 1); however, too much heat could cause fainting, swelling, or burns to skin and tissues, so use heat treatments with moderation. However,  A hot shower to the entire body does not help increase circulation to the hands.  You will not experience the degree of increased blood flow and lymphatic drainage as you will when the heat is focused to the hands.
To do this properly, prepare three towels:
The first is used to cover the surface that you will be sitting or laying on.
The second should be a large clean towel.  Soak it water as hot as you can stand to handle.  Wring the towel out as completely as you can, so that it is not dripping excess water.  Sit or lie down in a comfortable position so your hand is on top of the dry towel.  Apply the large hot moist towel on the palm of the hand for 5-15 minutes. .

A small element of potential danger is present when you apply heat to the hands, especially if you have reduced sensitivity in your hands.  You must be very careful the heat is not too great and that you do not fall asleep with the heat being applied.  If you have a fair complexion, or have a history of burning easily, take extra steps to protect yourself from injury.  It is important that you check your skin several times during this treatment to assure you are not burning yourself.  If you use common sense and care with the process, there should be little problem.

Use caution when implementing ice or heat treatments. Monitor time and the condition of your skin, and always test the hot or cold item before applying. Contact your physician or therapist for assistance.
 

Enroll in the IDDB

Calling all patients with #dupuytrens enroll in a study to help us all. Tell your friends about http://DupStudy.com! We need 10,000 people with Dupuytren disease and 1000 without Dupuytren disease to complete the study. The sooner we gather the information we need, the faster we can move toward a cure. 
SHARE THIS POST  . THE STUDY ALSO NEEDS INTERESTED PARTICIPANTS WHO DO NOT HAVE DUPUYTRENS. 
  To learn more about #dupuytrens see our website links at http://www.handctr.com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.html and vist the page https://www.facebook.com/dupuytrensnews/or @dupuytrensnews where new research updates are discussed.

Friday, May 4, 2018

WARM UP with SPRING AND PREVENT GOLF INJURIES

WARM UP with SPRING AND PREVENT
GOLF  INJURIES 



Saturday, December 9, 2017

#SnowblowerSAFETY #SNOWSAFETYTIPS

Each year hundreds of people suffer maiming or amputations of their fingers or hands due to the improper handling of snowblowers

The American Society for Surgery of the Hand would like to provide you with patient information to help you avoid these injuries during the winter season.
Injury Profile
Average age: 44 years
Sex: Male
Dominant hand — 90% of injuries
Amputations of tips of fingers
Middle finger most commonly injured
Common Weather Conditions
  • Heavy, wet snow
  • Large snow accumulation, greater than six inches
  • Temperature: 28 degrees Fahrenheit or greater
Injury Causes
  • Snow clogging the exit chute of the machine
  • Not noticing that the impeller blades are still rotating even though the machine is off
  • Operator attempts to clean the clogged exit chute with hands
  • Hands connect with the rotating blades, resulting in severe injury
Snowblowers are safe if used properly.
Remember — if your snowblower jams:
  • Turn it OFF!
  • Disengage CLUTCH.
  • DELAY, Wait five seconds after shutting machine off to allow impeller blades to stop rotating.
  • ALWAYS use a STICK or broom handle to clear impacted snow.
  • NEVER put your hand down chute or around blades.
  • Keep all shields in place. DO NOT REMOVE the safety devices on the machine.
  • Keep hands and feet away from all moving parts.
  • Keep a clear head, concentrate, and
  • DO NOT DRINK before using your snowblower!
REMEMBER — SAFETY FIRST AT ALL TIMES!

Saturday, November 4, 2017

Turkey Carving Safety Tips

TURKEY CARVING SAFETY TIPS

Every year, people severely cut their hand while carving a turkey. Luckily, these injuries are avoidable. Common sense knife technique combined with well establish Turkey carving tips will help to avoid problems.
Follow these tips to stay safe while enjoying your Thanksgiving  turkey feast: 


  • Never cut toward yourself. Your free hand should be placed opposite the side you are carving toward. Don’t place your hand underneath the blade to catch the slice of meat. Even better use a large fork or similar utensil to hold the bird in place while you cut.
  • Keep your knife handles and cutting area dry to avoid slips. Keep a dish towel handy to wipe off your utensils and soak up any juices. Good lighting around the cutting area is also important. 
  • Keep all cutting utensils sharp. Having a sharp knife will avoid the need to use a lot of force when cutting, which can be dangerous. Dull knives are more likely to cause slips and are still sharp enough to cause an injury. 
  • Let the turkey cool a bit first. Letting the Turkey rest helps retain juices and avoids burns.
  • Cut legs and wings at the joints but if you have to cut bone use kitchen shears instead of a knife
  • Remove the legs and wishbone first and serve the leg whole or cut the meat off by slicing parallel to the bone. This lets you stabilize the turkey leg better and makes knife use easier
  • Cut the breast meat away from the bone in one piece. Slice the breast meat when it is off the bird. Not only is it easier, safer, and less awkward, you'll  get better results. 

WHEN TO SEEK MEDICAL HELP

If you cut your finger or hand, bleeding from minor cuts will often stop by applying direct pressure to the wound with a clean cloth.
Visit the emergency room if you’ve cut yourself and:

  • Continuous pressure does not stop the bleeding after 15 minutes
  • You are unsure of your tetanus immunization status
  • You are unable to thoroughly cleanse the wound by rinsing with a mild soap and plenty of clean water
Visit a hand surgeon within a few days if you’ve cut yourself and:

  • You notice persistent numbness or tingling in the fingertip
  • You have difficulty moving or bending your fingers 
© portions by 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand modified by www.handctr.com



Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Fireworks Safety 4th of July and beyond

With the Fourth of July holiday fast approaching,  experts are urging people to use caution when handling fireworks and have provided a list of safety tips to consider.

According to the latest U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission report, fireworks sent roughly 11,000 people to the emergency room over the course of the Fourth of July holiday. Of these injuries, approximately 36 percent were to the hand, thumb and digits. Interesting enough, 40% of the injuries are caused by fireworks that were thought to be somewhat safe such as sparklers and firecrackers.

The number of firework-related injuries treated in emergency rooms in the United States has ranged from 8,500 to 9,800 since 1997; in 2011, 26% of patients were younger than age 15.1  Firework-related injuries range in severity from superficial burns to complete loss of the hand and fingers.  The most common injuries are burns to the fingers, hand, and wrist (26.7%), followed by injuries to the eye (14.9%), and open injuries to the hand and wrist (6.5%).2   Other sources report that the number of burns to the fingers, hand, and arm are as high as 41%.3  Burns account for more than 50% of firework-related injuries, 



Recent years were especially injurious and many high profile injuries occurred. Such as to the NFL's  Jason Pierre Paul  and in 2015 fireworks injuries reached  a 15 year high.



Be responsible when incorporating fireworks into your holiday and summer festivities. Provided below are 10 fireworks safety tips to keep yourself and others safe:
  • While lighting fireworks, never position any part of your body over them
  • After lighting fireworks, immediately back up to a safe distance
  • To avoid burns from sparklers, poke a hole at the bottom of a cup and put the handle of the sparkler through the hole. This technique will shield your hand from sparks that are emitted from the sparkler. It’s also important to wear gloves when using sparklers (leather preferred) as they can be as hot as a blow torch and over 15 times hotter than boiling water.
  • Never attempt to re-light or handle malfunctioning fireworks
  • Light only one firework at a time – at arm’s length – with an extended lighter
  • Always wear eye protection/safety glasses when lighting fireworks
  • Never carry a firework in your pocket or shoot them from a metal or glass container
  • Never aim or throw fireworks at another person, animal or building
  • Have a bucket of water or working garden hose accessible
  • Properly dispose of all fireworks (used and unused). Allow used fireworks to soak in water for a few hours before discarding.

The following precautions should be taken when attending a public fireworks display:

  • Obey safety barriers and ushers.
  • Stay back a minimum of 500 feet from the launching site.
  • Resist the temptation to pick up firework debris when the display is over.  The debris may still be hot, or in some cases, the debris might be “live” and could still explode.
  • Ensure all children have adult supervision.

The potential long-term severity of fireworks-related injuries can have undesirable outcomes to the body, so remember to enjoy the holiday safely and responsibly and don’t take any unnecessary risks.  

1. Hall JR Jr. Fireworks. Quincy, MA: National Fire Protection Association; 2013.
2. Canner JK, Haider AH, Selvarajah S, et al. US emergency department visits for fireworks injuries, 2006-2010. J Surg Res. 2014;190(1):305e311.
3. Fireworks information center: United States Consumer Product Safety Commission Website. http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/150398/Fireworks-Infographic-2015-web.pdf?epslanguage=en Published 2013. Accessed June 29, 2015.

portions taken from assh.org and other sources such as 


Monday, March 6, 2017

WARM UP WITH SPRING AND PREVENT INJURY GOLF INJURIES



WARM UP with SPRING AND PREVENT
GOLF  INJURIES 



Wednesday, February 8, 2017

WINTER STORM SNOWBLOWER ALERT...AGAIN

As physicians dedicated to the care of the Hand and Upper extremity we want to inform the public concerning the perils and pitfalls of improper snow blower use.  Physicians, nurses, allied health professionals and therapists who deal with these injuries live in fear of the first heavy wet snow of the season. Invariably injuries are seen despite general knowledge that these injuries occur. These safety tips cannot guarantee against injury but hopefully if you are reading these or even better spreading these, it is one more step towards preventing these types of injuries.




Recommendations for safe use of a jammed snow blower snow blowers include: (OCD STICK)

1. If the snow blower jams, immediately turn it OFF
2. Disengage the CLUTCH
3. DELAY...Wait 10 seconds after shutting of to allow Impeller Blades to stop rotating
4. Always use a STICK or broom handle to clear impacted snow. The stick most be strong enough to avoid breakage or eye injures can result from flying fragments.
5. Never put your hand near chute or around blades
6. Keep all shields in place. Do not remove safety devices on machine
7. Keep hands and feet away from moving parts
8. Keep a clear head, concentrate and ...
    Do not drink alcoholic beverages before using a snow blower


Keep Fingers and Hands Safe: Practice Snowblower Safety

Each year hundreds of people suffer maiming or amputations of their fingers or hands due to the improper handling of snowblowers

The American Society for Surgery of the Hand would like to provide you with patient information to help you avoid these injuries during the winter season.
Injury Profile
Average age: 44 years
Sex: Male
Dominant hand — 90% of injuries
Amputations of tips of fingers
Middle finger most commonly injured
Common Weather Conditions
  • Heavy, wet snow
  • Large snow accumulation, greater than six inches
  • Temperature: 28 degrees Fahrenheit or greater
Injury Causes
  • Snow clogging the exit chute of the machine
  • Not noticing that the impeller blades are still rotating even though the machine is off
  • Operator attempts to clean the clogged exit chute with hands
  • Hands connect with the rotating blades, resulting in severe injury
Snowblowers are safe if used properly.

more information: