Friday, October 5, 2018

Dupuytren's Disease Does it get worse as the weather gets colder?






IT makes sense. Cold impairs circulation and can increase stiffness, reduce circulation and have other effects. Poor circulation or diabetes which also affects circulation can make dupuytrens worse. Smoking similarly impairs circulation and make dupuytrens worse. 

Does your Dupuytrens get worse in the winter?



What is Dupuytren's disease?
Dupuytren’s disease is an abnormal thickening of the tissue just beneath the skin known as fascia. This thickening occurs in the palm and can extend into the fingers (see Figure 1). Firm cords and lumps may develop that can cause the fingers to bend into the palm (see Figure 2), in which case it is described as Dupuytren’s contracture. Although the skin may become involved in the process, the deeper structures—such as the tendons—are not directly involved. Occasionally, the disease will cause thickening on top of the finger knuckles (knuckle pads), or nodules or cords within the soles of the feet (plantar fibromatosis).  Dupuytren's Disease is named after a French anatomist and military surgeon Baron Guillaume Dupuytren(1777-1835).

What causes Dupuytren's disease?

The cause of Dupuytren’s disease is unknown but may be associated with certain biochemical factors within the involved fascia. The problem is more common in men over age 40 and in people of northern European descent. There is no proven evidence that hand injuries or specific occupational exposures lead to a higher risk of developing Dupuytren’s disease.

Dupuytrens treatment using moist heat




BENEFITS OF HEAT TREATMENTS

Heat or warmth will help get things moving by speeding up the molecules in tissues and increasing blood flow. Heat is helpful for stiff joints and muscles, and can be useful prior to an activity. We often see an athlete warming up before a workout.
A warm shower or bath can help sore, stiff joints, especially in the early morning.  A warm compress or heating pad can also relieve stiffness (Figure 1); however, too much heat could cause fainting, swelling, or burns to skin and tissues, so use heat treatments with moderation. However,  A hot shower to the entire body does not help increase circulation to the hands.  You will not experience the degree of increased blood flow and lymphatic drainage as you will when the heat is focused to the hands.
To do this properly, prepare three towels:
The first is used to cover the surface that you will be sitting or laying on.
The second should be a large clean towel.  Soak it water as hot as you can stand to handle.  Wring the towel out as completely as you can, so that it is not dripping excess water.  Sit or lie down in a comfortable position so your hand is on top of the dry towel.  Apply the large hot moist towel on the palm of the hand for 5-15 minutes. .

A small element of potential danger is present when you apply heat to the hands, especially if you have reduced sensitivity in your hands.  You must be very careful the heat is not too great and that you do not fall asleep with the heat being applied.  If you have a fair complexion, or have a history of burning easily, take extra steps to protect yourself from injury.  It is important that you check your skin several times during this treatment to assure you are not burning yourself.  If you use common sense and care with the process, there should be little problem.

Use caution when implementing ice or heat treatments. Monitor time and the condition of your skin, and always test the hot or cold item before applying. Contact your physician or therapist for assistance.
 

Enroll in the IDDB

Calling all patients with #dupuytrens enroll in a study to help us all. Tell your friends about http://DupStudy.com! We need 10,000 people with Dupuytren disease and 1000 without Dupuytren disease to complete the study. The sooner we gather the information we need, the faster we can move toward a cure. 
SHARE THIS POST  . THE STUDY ALSO NEEDS INTERESTED PARTICIPANTS WHO DO NOT HAVE DUPUYTRENS. 
  To learn more about #dupuytrens see our website links at http://www.handctr.com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.html and vist the page https://www.facebook.com/dupuytrensnews/or @dupuytrensnews where new research updates are discussed.

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